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August 09, 2018

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Hi Brian

Could U pls tell in which catergory this example is :

A guy arrested because he slept with his feet to the kaâba

said to the judge :
"If you pls tell me where God is not, . . . I gladly put my feet in that direction ! "

I find this verry scientific , poetical, nihilistic, believing, relativisting
and above all SO Logic myself

I would add a category : "WÄNIGER WÄRE MEHR"
like
tell a swimmer to breath

777

With all this in mind, I have no choice but to declare Tucson as the best commenter.

Brian, I enjoyed this post greatly. Probably because I’m so intrigued by how people think/psychology/personalities. I also had an epiphany just last night. I’m far too critical of other people. Try to be objective but often allow all my emotional baggage to cloud my thinking. Objectivity is relative. Truth is relative. This whole world is relative.

"With all this in mind, I have no choice but to declare Tucson as the best commenter"

-- Thanks, but I'm not sure what that says about other commenters here since I know almost nothing.

777, Not sure what Brian would say but I thought about it and I would categorize your style as ‘bipolar’. With that said I’m very fond of the BP population. I used to work for the Broad’s Stanley Center (MIT & Harvard) which does genetic research focused primarily on genetic causes of bipolar and schizophrenia. They’ve been very successful in their research with schizophrenia but bipolar has been the exact opposite—the more they research BP the more complicated it turns out to be. The joke at the Stanley Center is that there are 39 different types of BP. Just a random number they use to basically indicate that it’s extremely difficult to pin down.

They’re some of the most brilliant and creative minds in history. It’s like they’re born with a strong connection to the higher mind...

@777
I’m not saying you ARE bp just saying your style is (almost a compliment).

Since childhood the thought would often come into my head, “People don't know how to suffer!” It felt a callous thing to think, but it was always there. I might have expressed it differently such as “People don't know they suffer.” Maybe it was because a war had just ended and things were difficult for everyone. I knew that pain was different from the suffering my thoughts spoke of.

Anyway, on reflection I see that my entire life has in different ways revolved around this topic of suffering, in fact I have lived a very ordinary life that has provided an abundance of what normal, everyday suffering is about. It has been an enquiry of mine both from a (layman's) science level to what we term spiritual.

In my comments here I think I try to express what I want to say about suffering. Looking at Brian's 'list' the various types more or less covers my background of investigation. Whether my comments reflect my years of 'investigation' into this suffering I can't say, but I recognize the broad cover of these 'types'.

@Turan

Hi

I don't remember if y'r rssb initiated
but if so :

Didn't your stand on pleasure & pain change considerably

Hope you grep my thought on this

777

Hi Turan, are you coming from a Buddhist perspective? Just curious. True, life is suffering but we inflict even more pain upon ourselves if we go through life with an “I deserve this, it’s my karma perspective.” I One asked Baba Ji why I had panic attacks and he told me it was because when you see God you feel guilty. However, I appreciate a more forgiving view these days. There’s a big difference between guilt and false guilt. So many hyper-religious and self righteous people inflict false guilt on others which only intensified suffering in this world. False guilt doesn’t purify the soul—it’s toxic, plain and simple.

Hope that didn’t come across as preachy—I just hate seeing people suffer especially when a shift in perspective can help alleviate pain.

Cheers

For the past several weeks I have had an extended vacation with a trip overseas and am enjoying another two weeks before having to start work again. It’s been really nice to have this time off but perhaps it’s given me too much time to spend commenting on a blog (something I’ve never actually done before visiting this blog). My experience here has been very eye opening. However, as I can identify strongly with the “Relativist” it’s now more clear to me why I haven’t been a blogger or active participant on a blog site previously and why I’m probably not the best person to be throwing out opinions or giving advice.

That being said, I see my experience with RSSB much more clearly now and have the confidence—thanks to the contributions of participants on this site—to move forward in my own direction free of the tyranny of RS hypocrisy and dishonesty.

But, again, being a “Relativist” I’ll move forward on my journey without commenting or blogging anti-RSSB sentiments. Mainly because I feel I’ve contributed all I need to on this site... and have gained the confirmation I needed to move in a new direction in life.

Thank you, Brian, for providing such a forum. I sincerely appreciate it as do many others.

Most likely won’t be seeing any other responses on this site so feel free to contact me at [email protected] (my account for junk emails) which I check at least once a month.

Thank you @everyone and all the best.

777 - RSSB initiated - no.

Sarah. Interesting - in that I was going to add that my observations re our lives and suffering formed many years (decades) before I'd heard of Buddhism. My observations evolved from watching nature. I saw the simplicity and harmony in the natural world that surpassed the complications of our human world. Of course there is pain in nature but I felt that in humans, perhaps due to our self-based thinking habit we tend to court a gnawing insecurity that we call suffering.

My later reading was the likes of J. Krishnamurti and Alan Watts, through which I encountered Buddhism and Taoism – which complimented my nature outlook on life. Today I embrace Zen (Chan) - but only where it is not contaminated by cultural influences and/or Indian metaphysics.

If anything I would categorise myself as a naturalist.

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